Article

CA updates Wily Web app management tools

Matt Stansberry

Just four months after Wily Technology [Inc.] was acquired by CA [Inc.], the system management software supplier has refreshed the Wily Web application management software.

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The application, called Introscope 7, lets expert and nonexpert users use a common language for analyzing app performance and availability, incident management, service- level agreement management, Sarbanes-Oxley Act, and Information Technology Infrastructure Library compliance and capacity planning.

One expert said the quick turnaround of the release is a good sign that CA has learned from missteps in the past concerning acquisitions. "With new management, CA is more interested in turning things around from acquired technology, rather than using it to build a customer base, said Rich Ptak, a principal at Ptak, Noel & Associates, Amherst, N.H. "They buy a technology to use it."

Application management software has caught the attention of many IT pros of late. Software that automatically monitors and displays the relationships between complex applications and their supporting components is quickly becoming a must-have function for IT managers.

Ptak said the most significant stamp CA put on the Wily technology is the integration into the rest of the CA product line. Also, CA has the ability with its broader sales coverage to get it in front of more people. CA, based in Islandia, N.Y., was formerly known as Computer Associates.

"Wily customers are going to have positive experiences with the acquisition because it gives them access to a more stable company, wider capabilities and functionality," Ptak said.

The Introscope 7 release will also support a feature for managing .NET applications, scheduled for release later this year by the Wily Technology division. Introscope for .NET will be able to monitor .NET applications running in the production environment down to the component level, including their interactions with back end databases, such as Microsoft SQL Server.

"As we move toward componentized architectures, Web application management is going to become increasingly critical," Ptak said. "Management is being pushed down in the hardware, but at the same time it's moving up in the stack. There are people who still feel that management is a low-level function and will be driven into the silicone, but anybody who manages an operation of any size will tell you it's not an easy task."

Let us know what you think about the story; e-mail: Matt Stansberry, Site Editor


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