Premium Content

Access "Understanding wear leveling for solid-state disks"

Stephen Bigelow Published: 15 Nov 2012

Flash memory provides fast, inexpensive and non-volatile storage, and has become an essential enabling technology for a huge array of electronic devices, like simple flash thumb drives and digital cameras. More recently, it’s made its way into data centers in tier-one solid state drive (SSD) products. But after repeated write cycles, flash memory cells wear out. To protect against that, manufacturers have developed wear-leveling techniques that distribute newly written data evenly across the entire memory device—and make sure that data isn’t corrupted or lost. The Problem with Flash All of today’s flash memory cell designs suffer from a limited number of write cycles. Saving new data involves changing the bit pattern in a flash memory device, which first requires the bits to be zeroed and then rewritten with new data bits. Each write cycle puts stress on the physical memory cells. After about 5,000 write cycles (depending on the design and manufacture of the flash memory), the physical memory cells can become unreliable. This wear can compromise the file ... Access >>>

Access TechTarget
Premium Content for Free.

By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy

What's Inside

Features

More Premium Content Accessible For Free

  • For savings, IT must recharge its approach to power usage
    recharge_approach_power_usage.png
    E-Handbook

    Power consumption accounts for a large portion of data center operating costs, so it's important to understand power usage and efficiency when ...

  • Production workloads go boldly to the cloud
    MI_0414.png
    E-Zine

    Some enterprises are charging ahead with a cloud-first approach to their workloads -- not just test and dev, but production workloads as well. That ...

  • For DR, cloud is the great equalizer
    MI_0314.png
    E-Zine

    Disaster recovery is hard and expensive, based on the many enterprises with partial -- or no -- DR plans. But cloud computing is bringing DR to the ...