Topics Archive Definitions

  • A

    abend (abnormal end)

    An abend (a combining of two words, abnormal end, when operator messages were as short as possible) is an abnormal, rather than planned, end or termination of a computer program because of some problem with how it is running.

  • ANSI (American National Standards Institute)

    ANSI, American National Standards Institute, organization for fostering, development of technology standards, industry groups, International Organization for Standardization, ISO, International Electrotechnical Commission, IEC, computer standards, American Standard Code, Information Interchange, ASCI, Small Computer System Interface, SCSI, what is, definition, term, glossary

  • B

    back-end

    Front-end and back-end are terms used to characterize program interfaces and services relative to the initial user of these interfaces and services.

  • brownfield (brownfield deployment, brownfield site)

    A brownfield deployment, in information technology, is the installation and configuration of new hardware or software that must coexist with legacy IT systems.

  • C

    channel

    In telecommunications in general, a channel is a separate path through which signals can flow. Depending on the context, this term has various meanings.

  • channel extender

    A channel extender is a device used with IBM's S/390 line of computers to increase the maximum communication distances between the S/390 channel-connected mainframe computers, or between an S/390 and peripheral devices such as workstations, printers, and storage devices.

  • CICS (Customer Information Control System)

    CICS (Customer Information Control System) is an online transaction processing (OLTP) program from IBM that, together with the COBOL programming language, has formed over the past several decades the most common set of tools for building customer transaction applications in the world of large enterprise mainframe computing.

  • computer-intensive

    Computer-intensive is a term that applies to any computing application that requires the resources of a lot of computers, such as grid computing.

  • D

    data center services

    Data center services is a collective term for the supporting components necessary for the proper operation of a repository for storage, management and dissemination of data organized around a body of knowledge or pertaining to an enterprise... (Continued)

  • E

    Electric plugs for each country

    Electrical plugs and voltages for different countries around the world.

  • event forwarding

    Event forwarding is the transmission of information to a centralized computer concerning events that take place on remote computers or servers... (Continued)

  • I

    IMS (Information Management System)

    IMS (Information Management System) is a database and transaction management system that was first introduced by IBM in 1968. Since then, IMS has gone through many changes in adapting to new programming tools and environments.

  • R

    real-time operating system (RTOS)

    A real-time operating system (RTOS) is an operating system that guarantees a certain capability within a specified time constraint. For example, an operating system might be designed to ensure that a certain object was available for a robot on an assembly line. In what is usually called a "hard" real-time operating system, if the calculation could not be performed for making the object available at the designated time, the operating system would terminate with a failure. In a "soft" real-time operating system, the assembly line would continue to function but the production output might be lower as objects failed to appear at their designated time, causing the robot to be temporarily unproductive.

  • S

    screen scraping

    Screen scraping is programming that translates between legacy application programs (written to communicate with now generally obsolete input/output devices and user interfaces) and new user interfaces so that the logic and data associated with the legacy programs can continue to be used.

  • single point of failure (SPOF)

    A single point of failure (SPOF) is a potential risk posed by a flaw in the design, implementation or configuration of a circuit or system in which one fault or malfunction causes an entire system to stop operating.

-ADS BY GOOGLE

SearchWindowsServer

SearchServerVirtualization

SearchCloudComputing

Close